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What to Do if Your Kid Has a Dental Emergency


As a parent, watching your child experiencing any type of emergency, including a dental emergency, can cause quite a bit of panic. Moreover, if you panic, your child might also panic, even if the injury is not that severe. Although it may be hard, it is important to remain calm in the event of a dental emergency. Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry is here to help.

Common Emergencies Experienced by Children


There are several different types of dental emergencies that your child might experience. These emergencies include
•  Toothaches.
•  Having a tooth knocked out.
•  Dental intrusions, when a tooth is pushed deeper into the jaw.
•  Displacement.
•  Broken teeth.
•  Root fractures.
•  A dental concussion. This occurs when a tooth has been knocked. The tooth may not be damaged, but it can become temporarily or permanently discolored.
•  Injuries to the soft tissues.

Taking Care at Home


When your child experiences a dental emergency, there are things that you can do at home. What you should do depends on the exact situation.
•  If your child has bitten their lip, tongue, or cheek and they are experiencing bleeding, you can place a piece of damp gauze on the wound. Have your child apply gentle pressure. If the bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes, it is important to seek immediate medical attention.
•  If your child is complaining of a toothache, you should first help your child gently, but thoroughly, brush and floss their teeth. If nothing is removed, or you notice other signs of an infection, call our office right away.
•  If your child has something stuck in their gums or teeth, use floss to gently remove the object. Do not use anything sharp.
•  If your child knocks out a tooth and it is whole, first make sure your child does not have a more serious injury. Pick the tooth up by the crown and clean it off under cool water. Store the tooth in a jar of milk and contact our office right away. In many cases, knocked out teeth can be replanted.

Calling the Office


We can treat some different dental injuries right here in our office. It is important after providing your child with immediate care at home that you call our office immediately. We will do our best to get your child in as soon as possible. If the injury occurs after hours or during the weekend, you can still call. If you do not think that the emergency can wait until the next business day, then you should head to the emergency room.

How Can I Help My Child Avoid a Dental Emergency?


You can help your child avoid dental emergencies. If they play sports, make sure that they have a properly fitting sports guard. Make sure that they do not use their teeth to open packaging. Reduce trip hazards in the home and make sure that your child does not run with objects in their mouth. It is also crucial that you bring your child in for regular dental cleanings and exams every six months to make sure that their mouth is healthy. Additionally, you could prepare a dental emergency kit complete with gauze, a small cup, mouthwash, floss, and a cold compress. Keep in near your regular emergency kit for easy access.

While it is hard to see your child in pain, it is important that you remain calm. If your child has experienced a dental emergency, call Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry at 360-659-8100, 360-863-8700, 425-367-4149, 360-339-8000 for more information today.

We Look Forward To Meeting You



Our front office staff is happy to discuss our services with you. Our dentists are here to serve your children and teens. For more information, contact one of our multiple Seattle area offices.



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Puget Sound Pediatric Dentistry, 919 State Ave, Suite 104, Marysville, WA, 98270 - Associated Words: emergency pediatric dentist Marysville WA• pediatric dentist Marysville WA• 360-659-8100, 360-863-8700, 425-367-4149, 360-339-8000• www.pugetsoundpediatricdentistry.com• 8/15/2019